Saturday, 16 June 2012

Rocket Stove Workshop - more detailed text to follow...

We basically used 2 and a bit of these large oil cans to make the stove



One had to have the lid off, as above [the start of the snipping], and one had to have the lid and base off, as these bits were used to make the chimney extension and the fuel inlet



Once the two tubes were made and riveted; they were put onto the clay pre-made elbow [see www.wildstoves.co.uk if you want o buy one...


If you don't want to buy one, you can make the elbow out of metal yourself, and use a square inlet and chimney, as shown


The third can is cut in half to make a lid and somewhere to rest the pot [and also acts as a skirt to keep the pot hot], and the middle chimney needs to fit into a hole in the middle so make a hole to fit, and bend tabs down to make the fit even tighter. Then once you know it fits, fill the bottom with an insulator - we used vermiculite - fill right to the top.


Supplied with the elbow are two spacer tubes, and a grate just like in normal fires - make sure these are fitted and in position as shown. The wood to be burnt goes on the top and any ash falls through.


We used a separate oil canister to add height to save bending down when trying to get it lit


It was a tad windy so took a while to get it going...


Once we added dry wood, it was burning away - you can see we snipped out somewhere for the pan handles to drop the pan lower down the skirt.

POPCORN


And this is it, in situ - 10 minutes after we finished making it with popcorn on the hob.


And even though the pan was hot, the insulation meant the sides were still cool. Genius!


This one [which I made with Tracey] will stay at the Windmill Community Garden...and I'll make a few with my students later in the year [next term I think]...

3 comments:

kealon hall said...

great stove mate

Zazen999 said...

Thanks Kealon.
When you get your blog up and running, post a link to it and I'll follow your blogging activity.

5olly said...

we have a similar contraption, but it's one we bought. Kelly Kettle's are the best tool on an allotment. ever!